Off on a comet!

Patents began in the United States on this day today.

**Closing Soon** Expressions of Rocky Mountain National Park: A Centennial Celebration

The Pike Expedition and Colorado.

Off on a comet!

After a four billion mile journey of ten years across the solar system, last August, the European Space Agency (ESA)…

Colorado, sunshine, and air pollution.

The absence of sunshine from Colorado this summer hasn’t escaped residents’ notice, nor even been ignored nationally. The New York Times printed a story about it today, comparing the recently-vacated haze (from forest fires in Canada) to the inversion, popularly known as “the Brown Cloud,” that used to plague Denver in the mid-to-late 20th century. The Colorado Department of Public Health conducted a study on air pollution…

51 years of the Civil Rights Act.

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy issued a call for new civil rights legislation, motivated in large part by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference’s (SCLC) Birmingham campaign, led by James Bevel and Martin Luther King, Jr., among others. Kennedy’s assassination would prevent his making meaningful progress during his life, but in his first presidential address before a joint session of Congress, Lyndon Johnson encouraged his…

Hackathon & Workshop: Analyzing Ice-Core Data with Apache Spark

The Gemmill Library is hosting a free hands-on workshop on using Apache Spark to handle Data-Analysis tasks on June 29th from 3pm-5pm in Math 150. Apache Spark is a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing. This workshop will be taught by Prasanth Prahladan, a graduate student in Electrical Engineering and a University Libraries Provost’s Fellow. When: Monday June 29th 3-5PM Where: Gemmill Library…

Happy birthday, GPO!

The U.S. government, as we in Government Information are fond of telling folks, is the largest publisher in the world, and the Government Publishing Office (GPO), is the engine driving that publication machine. Established by a joint resolution of Congress on this day in 1860, and originally known as the Government Printing Office, the GPO is headed by the Public Printer of the United States, who…

(un)developed Art Exhibit at Triptych

for blog

CU-Boulder graduate student, Nick Valcourt, explores the explicit and implicit relationships between international development providers and recipients. Nick Valcourt is a graduate student at the Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities, College of Engineering and Applied Science – University of Colorado Boulder. Now on exhibit through summer in the Tryptic Gallery Norlin Library 3rd floor (Across from Special Collections)

Today in history: America meets the Statue of Liberty.

On this date in 1885, the Statue of Liberty arrived by boat in New York Harbor. Designed by Frederic Bartholdi and built by Gustave Eiffel, the arrival of the Statue capped off one long phase of the project and began the final one: assembly. In the 1877 joint resolution empowering the president to select a site for the gift, it was referred to as the…

How much do you know about time zones?

If you’re taking a trip of much distance this summer – whether driving or flying – there’s a good chance that trip’ll take you outside of the Mountain Time Zone. In the continental United States, there are four time zones: Eastern, Central, Mountain, and Pacific. Alaska resides in the Alaska Time Zone, one hour further back than Pacific time, and Hawaii another hour back still…

Today in history: the Supreme Court rules on Loving v. Virginia.

Loving v. Virginia was a landmark Supreme Court case concerning an interracial couple, Richard and Mildred Loving, who had been sentenced to a year in jail, under the state’s 1924 Act to Preserve Racial Integrity. Their sentence had been suspended, on the condition that they move away from Virginia, and in 1964, after several years of living in the District of Columbia, Mrs. Loving contacted…