Government Information

More than weather reporting – A brief history of NOAA

Barely five months after Meriwether Lewis and William Clarke’s Corps of Discovery returned to St. Louis, Congress in 1807 presented President Thomas Jefferson with a bill that would charge the government to train an investigative eye more nearby and “cause a survey to be taken of the coasts of the United States, in which shall…

African American Coloradans in History

To celebrate Black History Month, the Government Information Library is honoring some notable Coloradans. This week we focus on Rachel Bassette Noel, the first African American woman to hold public office in Colorado. Rachel Bassette Noel (1918–2008) was the first African-American woman to hold public office in Colorado following her election in 1965 to the…

Friends of the CU Libraries Celebrates Rocky Mountain National Park’s 100 Years

The Friends of the CU Libraries will host a panel event celebrating Rocky Mountain National Park’s 100th Anniversary on Thursday, March 5 from 4:00-6:00 PM in CBIS, Norlin 5th Floor. Five CU-Boulder researchers will speak at One Park, Many Perspectives: An Exploration of Rocky Mountain National Park at its Centenary. The panel presentation, which is…

African-American Coloradans in History

To celebrate Black History Month, the Government Information Library is honoring some notable Coloradans. This week we begin with Oliver Toussaint Jackson, the founder of Dearfield, Colorado. Oliver Toussaint Jackson (1862–1948) was an entrepreneur from an early age; at 14 years old he began working in the catering and restaurant business in Ohio. After moving…

“’Congressional Pugilists’ – A Story of Congressional Dysfunction in the 18th Century”

On January 30, 1798, Representatives Matthew Lyon (from Vermont) and Roger Griswold (Connecticut) got into a heated argument on the floor of Congress. Lyon, a native Irishman who fancied himself a champion of the common man, accused the Connecticut delegation of exploiting their positions for their own profit. Griswold retorted by bringing up Lyon’s service…

Cuba and the United States: a brief history

President Barack Obama’s administration announced its intention earlier this week to “normalize” relations with the Republic of Cuba, lifting trade and travel sanctions that have been in place for over half a century and removing the nation from a list of state sponsors of terrorism kept by the U.S. State Department. The United States and…

Pearl Harbor and after in Colorado

Over 100,000 Japanese-Americans were interned at camps by the government of the United States after the country entered World War II. One of those camps was in Colorado.On the morning of December 7, 1941, the U.S. Naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, was bombed by forces of the Navy of the Japanese Empire. It was…

150th Anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre

This Saturday will mark the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre.This Saturday will mark the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre. On  November 29, 1864, early in the morning, nearly 700 soldiers attacked a camp of Cheyenne and Arapaho people living near Fort Lyon. The camp had been flying an American flag under…

A Jewel in Colorado’s Crown: Rocky Mountain National Park

On January 26, 1915, Woodrow Wilson signed the bill that formally created Rocky Mountain National Park near Estes Park, Colorado, officially recognizing the over 400 square mile site as the grand destination humanity had known it to be for thousands of years. A trip to Rocky Mountain National Park is a visit to the forest,…